Positive News from Shiseido, Histogen and Dr. Brotzu

As if the great news from Aclaris earlier this month wasn’t enough, out of the blue we get three new positive developments from totally separate entities during the past week.

Shiseido

Yesterday, this blog’s unpaid but respected Japanese correspondent “nosyu” provided us with a link to a big news story that Shiseido was commencing clinical trials in Japan in partnership with Tokyo Medical University and Toho University. Seems like the trial will entail 60 men and women and go on for up to 3 years. Another new article estimates the cost of treatment to be around $900.

Shiseido’s technology is probably identical to what the original inventor Replicel is/was doing in terms of autologous cell culturing and transplantation using the permanent hair at the back of a balding person’s scalp. Perhaps Shiseido might have its own improvements to the Replicel process, but that is hard to tell at the moment. It seems like one set of injections will give lifelong results!

Note that Dr. Ryoji Tsuboi of Tokyo Medical University (who will lead the clinical research work there), is also co-president of next year’s 10th World Congress for Hair Research. So Shiseido is hiring very reputable people. This development is especially good news since Replicel’s stock price and previously strong social media responsiveness have both tanked in recent months (perhaps this newly published video with Replicel CEO Lee Buckler was not filmed too long ago and Replicel is still continuing work in the hair department). Thankfully, Shiseido (the world’s fifth largest cosmetics company) is not letting us down.  Also see my post from 2014 on Japan’s new laws fast-tracking stem cell treatments.

Histogen

To my utmost surprise, Histogen’s CEO Dr. Gail Naughton responded to some questions from HLT forum member “Tomtom21”. Over the years, I have become disenchanted with this company (despite my regular coverage of it on this blog) since it seems to have been in the news for at least ten years. Numerous presentations, successful funding rounds and much media attention have still not led anywhere insofar as treatment being made available anytime soon to the general public. Nevertheless, it is refreshing to see the CEO responding to people in person. I always found Ms. Naughton to be fairly genuine and sincere and hope that her company does end up like this.

Getting back to the subject matter of this news item, Dr. Naughton states that Histogen’s HSC treatment will be made available in Mexico first in 2018 (!) and they will soon be conducting a large-scale 330-person clinical trial in Mexico with a local partner. They are also close to getting a partner in China for what I assume will be human trials in that country. The company is also planning for Phase I trials in women and Phase II trials in men in the US soon. Dr. Naughton said that higher doses are more effective per Dr. Craig Ziering’s findings. Finally, the company will most likely get more funding from an Asian partner, and will also prepare for an initial public offering (IPO) thereafter.

Dr. Giovanni Brotzu

While all these new-age companies with their sizable funding rounds look into cellular biology, 81-year old Dr. Giovanni Brotzu is old school and prefers a topical lotion product. I never wanted to cover this man’s work in the first place, but here I am mentioning him for a second time this year! Last week Dr. Brotzu gave a detailed interview to an Italian hair loss forum team. The big news is that there is an ongoing trial for 60 androgenetic alopecia patients. Virtually everything he says sounds reasonable to me, although I have done very little research on the accuracy of some of the more esoteric things that he mentions that I do not understand. He does make some excuses about the lack of photos.

Someone more motivated than myself can check out the Italian forum threads on this man and see if people over there are also optimistic. I like the fact that Dr. Brotzu openly and honestly states that his product will not help regain long-lost hair. Most likely, the best case scenario is that you will only regain what you lost in the past five years. Still a great potential solution for many younger people. Dr. Brotzu has a few patents to his name (the details for some of which include information on hair growth related applications).

324 thoughts on “Positive News from Shiseido, Histogen and Dr. Brotzu”

  1. Seems like lots of products coming to market in near future. Even if they don’t work as expected, they might work better together? Like use JAK approved for AA on AGA along with Brotzu one? Atleast we will have few more thing to try, currently many just give up and even don’t care for hair loss as they know nothing gonna help.

  2. Is there any company claiming to grow back Norwoods maybe or are they all focused on damage control? Histogen I thought seemed modest…

  3. I’m sorry but my gut tells me bronzu will just dissappear. Just like kelopesia. If it does make it to market it will have results like neogenic. I still have hope for histogen. She showed regrowth and thickening in her pictures. Yeah there might have been some comb over stuff but there is obvious regrowth. Bronzu just shows a baby with a weird hair growth which looks totally fake in my opinion. Why use a baby? He should use an adult for new drugs. Isn’t there some ethical standards there.

  4. You are correct, Swoop. I have been waiting for better treatments since 2000, when i jonned hairsite.com and heard about dutasteride. But it”s been 20 years under fina, min and ht to fix my temples.

    I thought you had high hopes for histogen and replicel. Anyway, please let us know what do you have in mind to fight the damage without fin. My wife and i are planning to have kids next year and i would like to stop finasteride 3 months before to do not put the fetus at risk.

    Thanks for the help!

  5. @Swoop, why are JAKs going to the graveyard. Didn’t they clearly state that they have seen interesting results and even regrowth when it comes to AGA?

    “We will be developing a topical JAK inhibitor for androgenetic alopecia, and the data on that is quite interesting in that they found that the systemic JAK inhibitor does not work for that particular indication, but the topical does, mainly as a function of the target being more superficial in the skin and not really accessible from a systemic circulation.”

    – Dr. Neal Walker

    Is this just bs?

    1. People have more faith on an Italian doctor who focuses on cardiology than a doctor researcher from a top research university who has been focused on mpb and started a company called follica backed a large venture capital called pure tech to release a novel hair loss treatment. I don’t understand the logic in some people. He will bring us a game changer. He put in the normal time of 12 years for clinical trials to market and has kept quiet like what a normal and professional person would do to keep his successful treatment protected .

      1. But mjones, why did Cots say in an interview that we mustn’t think of future in terms of a cure but rather as new ‘treatments’?

        OK yeah so I get that fixing damaged follicles isn’t close and in that sense a true ‘cure’ is far away, but his method is supposed to bypass this problem by forming brand new hairs!

        I don’t get why he is so coy about using the word ‘cure’ when his development can grow de novo hairs which is the BASIS of a cure.

        1. I think he said that he likes to use the term “treatment,” rather than cure. This is because we have to keep treating the issue to gain what we get back. A cure would mean that you do it once and the problem is solved.

  6. Well something strikes me as strange about follica’s method…

    They say it can create new hair follicles but you will have to apply stuff on your head and perhaps use a home device. Now why would you need to go to that trouble? A hair should grow naturally on it’s own.

    Now if it was only necessary for a short time to help the new hairs develop, okay. But if you must manually maintain them forever then they are not functioning as normal hairs.

    1. Because its not a cure buddy. If it can grow you 100cm2 hair I wouldn’t mind up keeping them with a home device. These hairs are growing on a mpb zone of the scalp. They will be attacked by dht more than likely. That’s why he said a home device with an app. Probably a schedule on when to wound again to keep them active and healthy. Give me 100cm2 growth on top of what I have and I will be a happy camper:)

      1. Haha OK yeah.

        All I’m trying to work out is whether new hairs would be indistinguishable from existing hairs, or if they will be somehow inheritenly weaker. If it’s the latter then that would make for less attractive option.

        I don’t mind doing home treatment but I would rather hang onto ALL the hair, whether the originals or regenerated, with basic propecia.

    2. Can be both, a cure and a treatment to the cure maintenance.. and that is what would make it awesome from the business point of view. As is always said, a cure doesn’t interest the market but a treatment that solves the problem – and that for me is a cure, if I get all of my hair back I don’t mind spreading shit on my head on a daily basis for the rest of my life!!! if I get it back it’s cure and f it… I don’t mind if it is a treatment as long as it works.

  7. i think that any kind of treatment that gives a better results than what we are using today is welcome.

    for a complete cure i am sure that our kids will have more chances if not the cure itself

  8. Only hope for Shiseido to work is if they were secretly working on a similar therapy to Replicel and the technologies were sufficiently similar that Shiseido decided to buy them out instead of facing legal problems later. Because I don’t think Replicel’s method will work on it’s own, even if it was aiming in the right direction (multiplying cells from follicles in the back of the head).

  9. There are so many news and researches going on, why still most people are in panic and saying 20-40 year away?

    I started following just before 2 years so not sure if this amount of force in research is there from 2001? It must have increased and progressed, don’t see any reason to be such depressed.

    1. Yes that’s what I think. Wasn’t there in 2001 but pretty sure it wasn’t like it is now. There were a few “false prophets” like Gho in the 00s.

      I think T.Tsuji is the real deal and while there is no guarantee of his success, his positive outlook about hair regeneration is cause for optimism. Tsuji will know if it works or not by 2025 at the latest (more like 2022).

      If his method doesn’t work then yeah I will say it is out of reach.

  10. I read the PureTech document where it said they can create 100 new hairs per cm2 using Follica’s skin perturbation.

    Sorry but I can’t buy that. 100 new hairs per cm2 would be 20,000+ new hairs on the top of the scalp. That would make hair transplants redundant overnight. I call bullshit.

    1. While you are talking here. People are working very hard. Please continue. Thanks. More good news are coming.

    2. If it were to work like – and we have no idea how good it’s going to be yet – then yes it would and it would make their hiring of Washenik to be quite clever. If – and it’s a big if right now – Follica works well then you can bet hair transplant clinics will be offering this procedure.

      But until next year (or unless someone who blogs or uses social media gets in on the trial starting sometime in the next 6 months and can fill us in), we have no idea what Follica have got to offer. The language in the puretech docu does seem to suggest that this is something that will be big but then again, they’re talking it up to their stakeholders.

        1. @Paul P Don’t get wrong, I don’t expect any new info to come out for a long while nor do I “demand” it like some people do. It’s like pics or it didn’t happen but more on that point later.

          We heard nothing about the previous 3 trials apart from the one in Germany and I’d guess that the only bit of news we’ll get this year is regarding the new hires at Follica. VP of Clinical and Product development.

          I personally believe Follica are the best hope on the horizon and I’m not really drawn in by the naysayers who shit on Jaks and the like with their bro science. But! And there is a but, we really don’t know how good their treatment is. I mean, we do need a before and after pic to be blown away but that, if all goes well, won’t come for some time.

          I think their silence over the years has been on the whole a good thing. If they truly have a viable treatment for hairloss, then it’s understandable. Still a long road ahead and many questions to be answered but I don’t think there’s anything wrong with a healthy but sceptical dose of optimism for the future. See also Luis Garza’s study from last year which bolsters the wounding/demabrasion approach.

      1. Bells. In the pure tech doc it discusses how follica procedure will be performed by other clinics, most likely ht doctors. There is no way cots can perform all of this at his office haha. He is going to lease out his procedure to ht docs all over the place so it can be used by everyone due to high demand. Very smart move on cots to keep ht industry on his side. If he didn’t the ht industry would fight him to the end to block his treatment. Joining forces will make them both rich and open the doors to much better results. Imagine wounding scalp and getting 12k new hairs or more then adding ht if you need more density. Not sure how much 100cm2 squared hair equals out to on the scalp but it sounds like good amount.

        1. All that would be a dream. Everyone would be happy. Also I see no reason why the follica couldn’t be repeated over again.

          So I hope people who say that all we can look forward to in next 5 years is better maintenance will be pleasantly surprised!

          All I hope is that the 100 hairs per cm2 came straight from Cots and wasn’t some type of guesstimate by PureTech.

          But I wonder if they’ll be able to target the whole scalp. In tests, Cots found that hair grew in the middle of the wound. Maybe that would lead to concentrated areas of hairs interspersed with empty areas.

          1. If it is compoundable it is CURE.. if one gets about 100 hairs (terminal ones) per cm in one set that may be possible again after some while it’s to be supposed isn’t it? so depending on the degree of the hair loss in case, after one or two or three or whatever sets one would get the normal density, the original or even better… I mean, that theoretically speaking…

        2. Take a white piece of paper and draw a 1cm^2 square on it. Take a pencil and dot 100 small dots within that square. You will find that that is great density. If Follica can do this, we are looking at a “near cure” level treatment.

        3. “Very smart move on cots to keep ht industry on his side. If he didn’t the ht industry would fight him to the end to block his treatment.”

          Can you cite any precedents or in fact provide any evidence whatsoever to back up your claim that can at best be described ‘nonsensical’?

          1. And what makes one think that Follica will be partners with the “ht industry” where did one takes that ??

  11. @ William

    Check your scalp closely with 2 mirrors or let someone do it for you.
    Do you see follicle openings / pores on every single cm2 of your head?

    If yes, you don’t seem to have any scar tissue or fibrosis, which means the theory that Admin has posted, is valid.
    You might be able to regrow your old hair. Old hairs coming back.

    For those who see cm2’s where there are no follicles openings / pores anymore, you probably have irreversible hair loss due to scarring, meaning that Follica or Shiseido or Tsuji or HT are needed. New hairs.

    I hope that it is any relieve when you check your scalp.

      1. Whether you encounter any form of scarring (alopecia) or any form of fibrosis mainly depends on your genes, as always.

        Dr. Jeff Donovan has pretty good pictures on his instagram account about especially, but not only, scarring alopecia’s.
        https://www.instagram.com/donovanmedical/
        Just take a look.

        Only a small percentage of hair loss sufferers does not have AGA or AA or TE, in which scarring normally doesn’t take place. So the majority of us can only try to keep the HF’s alive with the stuff that is now on the market. Try to prevent as much damage as you can.

        People with scarring alopecia however have/need other treatment options like injections, mentioned on Jeff Donovans page.

    1. Ok thank you, but it’s difficult to see popenings / pores same with two mirrors. I am don’t sure to see this.

      If all my cells are dead, do you think that the futurs treatment will be effective for me?

        1. MPB AKA Androgenetic Alopecia IS REVERSIBLE. Thanks. That’s a great point. Everyone in the field of androgenetic / alopecia hair loss should know. Update your knowleadge…please.

          1. Yep but I have not a AGA. I have a medicinal diffuse alopecia. I lost ALL my hair because I took bad medicament (Prozac, Risperidone, Concerta, etc.) during many years at very very very very very high dose. Do you think that is reversible with futurs treatment same if my hair cycle are exhausted (matrix cells are dead)?

      1. Hello William,

        – Let someone else check your scalp like a dermatologist or
        – Take pictures outside from your head with your smartphone. You can enlarge the pictures on your desktop computer to check for pores / follicle openings

        If you see them on every cm2, you don’t have scarring.
        That is good news. The bad news is, we all are waiting for science to crack the signal which is needed to restart the terminal growth again.

          1. It’s possible that you have a combination of types of hairloss.
            1. Hairloss due to medication +
            2. AGA
            But this is all guessing, therefore rather ask a dermatologist.

            Probably you have the same itch / scalp pain / inflammation as a certain proportion of AGA sufferers has as well. Even the doctors are still not sure what the exact factors and steps in the AGA hair loss process are.

            My simplified assumption is: first DHT chokes and shrinks the hair follicle, the skin reacts with targeted inflammation and finally the immune system attacks and shuts everything down completely at the balding site. You may feel an itchy, stingy, painful, bruised, inflamed or burning scalp.

            However some might still disagree with this. Either way, I still think the immune system plays an important role in AGA, just like in AA, Scarring Alopecia, Seb Dermatitis, Psoriasis, Vitiligo, Reum Artritis and Crohn’s Disease.

            There is the JAK inhibitor family again: Welcome to the ITINIB’s !

          2. Oups.. I don’t write the good word. Cicatrization, not Healing. I am Quebecker, I speak French. My English is bad, sorry.

            No, I have not AGA, It’s sure. Nothing in my family loose hair. Dht is not the problematic. I have blood test for dht and the result is negative, and I try finasteride during two years and I have not effect.

            It’s a really medicinal alopecia and I am scared that my matrix cells are all dead. If my matrix cells are all dead, what futur treatment can help me?

  12. Some guys on an Italian forum seem to be making their own home version of brotzus lotion. One dude has posted pics – he seems to have grown a few hundred vellus hairs and some terminal hairs. He is a pretty advanced norwood and I think 40 yo.

    1. there is some guy called emanuelesharon in the italian forum claiming making similar lotion of brotzu. he talked about his home made lotion in the main brotzu thread of the ieson forum then he decide to creat a new thread.
      http://www.ieson.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=70491

      he claim that vellus hair appear where it was before silk bald spot. there is lot of hype about this homemade lotion in the italian forum.

      i’m not italian but i used google translator.

        1. @22 MPB AKA Androgenetic Alopecia IS REVERSIBLE. Thanks. That’s a great point. Everyone in the field of androgenetic / alopecia hair loss should know.

  13. Hi Moderator,

    Excellent blog, really comprehensive. Could I suggest something? I’d be great if you built a page listing out the leading treatments that you think are the top contenders for providing a cure or significant regrowth, and summarizing where they are in the pipeline and which companies are researching and developing them. Kinda like the “Roundups” tab on Macrumors.com as an example.

    1. Thanks Guy. You are probably the fifth person to request that! Maybe in several months after I finish a big project in my life.

  14. baldings “Would bioviva and telomores have any affect on hair?”

    I’m not a scientist but Bill Andrews is and he definitely mentioned ‘male pattern baldness’ in his interview on youtube. Liz also mentions skin condition all the time.

    So according to them. Yes. I wouldn’t know but I presume telomerase elongation would reverse all kind of senescent diseases.. AGA being one.

  15. Admin, are you going to post about the results of hasson and wongs topical finasteride? How safe and effective is it for rapidly thinning hair?
    Thanks

  16. Follica and Aclaris, maybe the two together, are where to look at as the bulls eye of our hopes of a new good treatment, in my opinion…

  17. I went to a very good ht dr and he said that his friend in England did clone follicles successfully (after getting 5 million pound from the government )but the body refused the follicles and did not accept it. Then I asked him do you think hair cloning will be available in the next 10 years, he said FOR SURE !

      1. They have been cloning hairs unsuccessfully like that since the early 2000s. Body rejects, incorrect hair direction, won’t cycle correctly etc . I agree with admin it sounds like Jahoda or old intercytex news from 2007

        1. Did Jahida try to clone the hairs in a petrie dish? Maybe that’s why they failed.

          Hopefully Tsuji’s injectable hair germ method will work a lot better (as it did in his mouse).

  18. Hmm I wonder why Shiseido decided to trust replicel in the first place.

    Replicel people!

    Yes I know it cost Shiseido peanuts to buy the method, but even so, didn’t they see straight through the bs of Hoffman and co? These guys are nothing but bandit opportunists with zero evidence their crap worked.

    I can only imagine that a language barrier issues helped mask replicel’s unprofessionalism during business negotiations in Japan.

    1. I’m sure the Japanese knew their treatment wasn’t that great but they knew the missing piece to it perhaps. Hopefully they tweaked it to make it successful. Japanese are really smart and I doubt they would spend money to buy sonething that has no chance of success. Maybe that’s why they took so long to start trials. Fix the missing replicrap I mean replicel couldn’t figure out. We shall see? I just want some follica to fill in my diffuse loss. Man if Samumed was released this year that would have been cool. Stop further balding and 10% growth. That would help so many of us hold on to what we have till follica or tsuji. I don’t understand why the hair loss industry has to be so freaking disappointing. Such a huge demand and we just have 2 lousy treatments.

      1. Absolutely, I hope the Japanese tweaked the replicrap to make it good lol.

        Anyway, I never understood how replicel had the rights to a technique using hair cells from the back of the head? How did they own such a common sense concept?!

        Maybe Hoffman just got in there real early in the 00s and patented this wide ranging concept. The basis seems sound but replicrap clearly didn’t know how to make it work. Ans how could they? They are basically the Hoffman and that McEltree dude who nobody knows much about. And Lee Buckler lol.

        How were these three donuts meant to know what to do lol.

  19. Hello guys.

    Did you see the pictures of the guy who’s been using a homemade version of Brotzu lotion? It’s not quite the same ingredients as Fidia will be using but similar. This guy is 46 years old and the first pic is at 10 days of usage and third pic is at 50 days.

    http://www.ieson.com/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=70491&whichpage=1

    When I saw the last pic, ive got to say, my interest in Brotzu lotion went up. To me, it looks like he has recovered some vellus hairs? He looks a bit little bit less bald?

    Bearing in mind its only 50 days in, using a ghetto home version of Brotzu. It looks kinda promising to me.

    Sure the lighting and angles are not quite the same, but there IS a difference there right? It’s not like kelopesia level, i.e. no change.

    He said he would post another progress pic in 20 days.

  20. there is an other guy in the italian forum called ‘spatolatorefolle ‘which will make the lotion from a professional laboratory based on the research of Dr. brotzu.

    you can take a look at his blog writting in italy: rivoluzionecapelli DOT blogspot DOT it

    he is updating his blog frequently. he had a meeting with this laboratory by 18 june. and his trying to make this lotion legal something like patent.

    the last post in his blog was the 29 june and he said that the laboratory/doctor called him and told him that the next week the necessasary component for the lotion will arrive.

    he says that soon he’s going to write an article in English, with this informations.

    1. keep us updated for those who can not read Italian! I like this as a far superior product to min. that would actually be worth the inconvenience of putting on you scalp daily. Min isn’t worth it. Would be cool if they combined this with Follica’s method just to see what happens…

  21. I started fin 3 months ago and my hair is getting even more diffuse. I don’t think there will be much improvement fron fin and even if there was a little, it would not make much cosmetic difference.

    It would be truly wonderful if Brotzu’s lotion could fill in my diffuse scalp in a cosmetically significant way.

    Then I could forget about hair for the time being and wait for the big regeneration treatment/s, i.e. Shiseido, Follica or RIKEN.

  22. I kinda feel like we are meant to be bald and a cure isn’t a possibility the more I think about it. It’s really a natural process that had to be a product of evolution at some point even tho it feels like it’s the stupidest jab at reproduction for cosmetic concerns. Anything we do to try and reverse it will ultimately end in the body trying to correct what is foreign to its programmed fate. Some people call it a disease but a disease almost every male inherits has at some point seems like a stretch. I totally hope I’m wrong but with all the ups and downs and really none of us for sure know if there is any progress to any of these company’s just he said she claims… it’s like looking for your glasses in the dark with a blindfold on.

    1. The body will eventually defeat drugs entering the body like Propecia or Rogaine. They lose their effectiveness for many after x amount of years. However, treatments like follica, replicrap, susheido, tsuji are cellular and using non dht cells, these will trick the body to grow resistant hair to dht. So technically a cure if they can make it grow 70,000 hairs lol

    1. Great,

      They mention “to be launched in Japan and other Asian countries in 2018”, meaning that we probably can go to more places in Asia in 2018. That may prevent extensive waiting lists.

      This is worth the waiting, especially when it really would be offered for 100.000 yen. Around $975 or €875! That is a small fraction of the amount you have to pay for a HT!

      But now the photos …

  23. If we can get thick regrowth with drugs and the drugs stay effective for 10 yrs then that will work too. Just as long as a new treatment comes out every ten years so the body has something new.

  24. Atherosclerosis is to my knowledge has nothing to do with evolution but may be genetic and lifestyle factors. Like all heart diseases it is thought to be very well remedied or at least mostly preventable by lifestyle changes such as excersize and diet and even after being diagnosed is said to greatly improve by changing these factors omega 3s aerobic you know the commercials. However mpb effects 95 percent of males whereas I suspect heart disease effects alot less and although we have seen alot of rub on the Internet with natural remedies I am skeptical on anyone saying with 3 days a week running around the block and taking my multivitamin lately my nw5 has gone back to my teenage line or hey everyone knows if you stay healthy you’ll never have hair loss i mean that’s what everythings natural preventative measure is however it doesn’t work for mpb as far as I know. Like I said I hope I’m wrong cuz I’d love my shaggy blonde hair back but listening to all this stuff just makes me not wanna get my hopes up too high.

  25. I’m going ahead and using as many natural topical Jak3 inhibitors as I can find. B&T psoriaflora creme & a goldenseal shampoo as of today. There’s a British hair product company with a whole line of Oregon Grape lotions and shampoos that I want to try as well. Maybe the only way it’s effective is pharmaceutical strength but im not going to wait around for clinical trials when this stuff is already available in homeopathic form, in hair products even… Its not like I’m trying to regrow a bald spot (yet) just want some thickening. I just started minoxidil too so I’m a bad test case. I just want other JAK believers to know there’s some options if you want a head start with this stuff.

  26. Anyone here with information about surgeons in Europe which perform good body hair transplants or w/e it’s called

  27. So how long before we have something better than minoxidil and Finastride?

    I’m doing PRP and Finastride and minoxidil, diffuse thinner. shit sucks fams, thank god im tall but i need to gain some wait or im gonna look like slenderman

  28. Also the doctor said that he has been working on hair cloning for 15 years now. then I asked him why did not he put that in the news ? He said because he does not want to raise people hope. This means there are researchers that are working under the radar.

  29. @Admin: what is your estimated date of a cure? do you firmly believe we can see it in next 5-10 years?
    Besides JAK, what do you believe in most?

  30. “He states that the treatment is more effective with people under age of 30 with a total stop of hair loss and regrowth”

    That’s one hell of a claim for Brotzu. If it’s true, hopefully it’ll come out sooner than later. I’ll be 30 in another 5 years….

  31. Okay, so here is a revamped version of what I tried posting a few weeks ago.
    Most of this will involve listings of recent clinical trials, and I also wanted to post an article about a topical delivery vehicle. I have access to the full text versions of any article that I list here as pdf’s, so it’d be cool if we could find a way to share them (I don’t want to be emailing a whole bunch of files).

    1. (2016). “Bee Venom Promotes Hair Growth in Association with Inhibiting 5α-Reductase Expression.”. Biological & pharmaceutical bulletin (0918-6158), 39 (6), p. 1060.
    (The article states that: Bee venom inhibited the expression of SRD5A2, which encodes a type II 5α-reductase that plays a major role in the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone. Moreover, bee venom stimulated proliferation of hDPCs and several growth factors (insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF)2 and 7) in bee venom-treated hDPCs dose dependently compared with the control group minoxidil 2%. In conclusion, bee venom is a potentially potent 5α-reductase inhibitor and hair growth promoter.)

    2. A bibliometric study of scientific literature in Scopus on botanicals for treatment of androgenetic alopecia Journal of cosmetic dermatology
    1473-2130
    Date: 2016 ,Volume: 15, Issue: 2, Page: 120-130
    (In conclusion, this is the first study in which a biblio-
    metric analysis was been made, in order to evaluate
    citation trends and most cited papers for medical plants
    used for treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Specifi-
    cally, the study has taken account of botanicals that
    inhibit the 5-alpha-reductase, such as Camelia sinensis,
    Carthamus tinctorius Puerariae flos, Red ginseng, that
    stimulate hair growth, such as Serenoa repens, Ginkgo
    biloba and that inhibit the inflammation, such as
    Malus domestica, Cuscuta reflexa roxb, Boehmeria
    nipononivea, Rosmarinus officinalis, Citrullus colo-
    cynthis, Citrus bergamia risso, Tobacco, Thujae occi-
    dentalis, Crataegus pinnatifida
    In conclusion, this is the first study in which a biblio-
    metric analysis was been made, in order to evaluate
    citation trends and most cited papers for medical plants
    used for treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Specifi-
    cally, the study has taken account of botanicals that
    inhibit the 5-alpha-reductase, such as Camelia sinensis,
    Carthamus tinctorius Puerariae flos, Red ginseng, that
    stimulate hair growth, such as Serenoa repens, Ginkgo
    biloba and that inhibit the inflammation, such as
    Malus domestica, Cuscuta reflexa roxb, Boehmeria
    nipononivea, Rosmarinus officinalis, Citrullus colo-
    cynthis, Citrus bergamia risso, Tobacco, Thujae occi-
    dentalis, Crataegus pinnatifida
    (In conclusion, this is the first study in which a bibliometric analysis was been made, in order to evaluate citation trends and most cited papers for medical plants used for treatment of androgenetic alopecia. Specifi- cally, the study has taken account of botanicals that inhibit the 5-alpha-reductase, such as Camelia sinensis, Carthamus tinctorius Puerariae flos, Red ginseng, that stimulate hair growth, such as Serenoa repens, Ginkgo biloba and that inhibit the inflammation, such as Malus domestica, Cuscuta reflexa roxb, Boehmeria nipononivea, Rosmarinus officinalis, Citrullus colocynthis, Citrus bergamia risso, Tobacco, Thujae occidentalis, Crataegus pinnatifida. Among these botanicals, the study objectively demonstrated that Camelia sinensis (epigallocatechin- 3-gallate), Serenoa repens, Citrullus colocynthis and Cuscuta reflexa were those most considered. Finally, the study demonstrated a growing interest for this topic).
    – citation: Mariangela Rondanelli, MD, PhD,1 Simone Perna, PhD,1 Gabriella Peroni, RDNs,1 & Davide Guido, PhD1,2,3 1 Endocrinology and Nutrition Unit, Section of Human Nutrition, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, Azienda di Servizi alla Persona, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy 2 Medical and Genomic Statistics Unit, Department of Brain and Behavioral Sciences, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy 3 Biostatistics and Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Department of Public Health, Experimental and Forensic Medicine, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy

    Will continue this thread with another post.

  32. 3. Adipose-derived SVF for Treatment of Alopecia. https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02626780

    “In 2001, however, the understanding of the potential of these SVF cells greatly changed as Zuk et al. demonstrated the ability of these cells to undergo not only adipogenic differentiation but also chondrogenic, myogenic, and osteogenic differentiation. 16 These cells were eventually renamed adipose-derived stromal cells or ASCs. Similar to MSCs, ASCs have also been shown to differentiate into cardiac cells and even neural progenitor cells in vitro . 161718The multipotency of ASCs has grown tremendously since these early studies as scientists continue to fine-tune and improve the differentiation of each pathway.” (BOOK CHAPTER
    Stem cells and regenerative medicine. Benjamin Levi, Derrick C. Wan, Victor W. Wong, Geoffrey C. Gurtner and Michael T. Longaker
    Plastic Surgery, 13, 212-239.e8)

    4. Phase 2A Study of Setipiprant Tablets in Androgenetic Alopecia in Males

    First received on May 20, 2016. Last updated on May 20, 2016.
    Purpose
    This study will evaluate the safety, tolerability and efficacy of the oral administration of setipiprant tablets 1000 mg twice daily (BID) relative to placebo and active comparator, finasteride 1 mg once daily, in 18 to 41 years old males with androgenetic alopecia (AGA).

    https://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT02781311

  33. If jak inhibitors pass the fda approval for aa, shouldn’t it pass clinical trials for safety in aga, it could go into fda approval with only clinical trials for efficacy.
    Jak came like from nowhere, and i wouldnt be suprised when it would be on the market for aga sooner than we thought.

    1. It is possible you could get prescribed it off-label if docs think it is safe enough in general. This would probably be the case if they approve it for something else that is relatively benign like psoriasis.

      1. Psoriasis causes detrimental psychosocial effects on people just like hair loss does. Calling psoriasis benign might offend some.

        Honestly, since tofacitinib is FDA approved for oral use, it may be possible to have a dermatologist (the patient would have to have an excellent relationship with the prescriber…liability if adverse drug reaction occurs). The medication order would have to be called into a compounding pharmacy, and the only way I could see this happening is at a major hospital/medical center. The dermatologist would call in the order to the inpatient compounding pharmacy, it would then need to be curiorred to the derm office (whether it’s in the hospital or off-site). The derm would then apply it to the patient’s scalp, and would characterize it as an experimental treatment (honestly I see all kinds of weird experimental treatments where I work; lavender aromatherapy for healing in the elderly; beet juice extract for certain cancer patients; leeches for various reasons; etc.) The ointment/cream could then either be sent home with the patient and/or another might be made for the patient to pick up at the hospitals/medical centers outpatient pharmacy.

        But the dermatologist(s) would have to consider the cost, how to make the topical (cream, ointment), and determine which delivery vehicle use in the base of the topical to prevent excessive systemic absorption.

  34. 5. CLINICAL TRIAL (Cortexolone 17a-propionate: A new antiandrogen acting on hair dermal papilla cells)
    A Phase 2 Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of CB-03-01 Solution, a Comparator Solution and Vehicle Solution in Males With Androgenetic Alopecia

    First received on October 7, 2014. Last updated on June 15, 2016.

    Purpose

    In this proof-of-concept study, the safety and efficacy of a solution formulation will be investigated in male subjects with androgenetic alopecia (AGA) after twice daily application for up to 26 weeks.

    6. Astressin-B? DS laboraties sells a topical astressin B in the United States.
    The package inset that accompanies the DS product states:
    – What about future research involving astressin-B? Most research planned for astressin-B involves systemic use as an oral or injectable medication. More treatments, developed and marketed as drugs, may appear in coming years. Spectral F7, however, is a comestic treatment available today.
    – Is the 15 parts permillion an effective dose of astressin-B? The 15 ppm of astressin-B found in Spectral F7 is higher than the concentration of most peptides found in topical products. The widely used biotinoyl tripeptide-1, for example, is recommended at a concentration of 5 ppm, and topical products usually contain between 2.5 and 5 ppm. The 15 ug daily dose of astressin-B in Spectral F7 (10 sprays twice per day) is three times as much as the 5 ug daily dose injected into mice during the published study. Nanosome encapsulation further potentiates the delivery of astressin-B in Spectral F7.
    – Is astressin-B a potential cure? Used as directed, astressin-B complements and optimizes a broad-spectrum therapy for greatest possible results. It is unlikely to be a cure by itself, however, since dozens of variables contribute to follicular dysfunction. While the initial media coverage has been exciting, the important clinical research has only just begun. A realistic projection, based on studies underway at DS laboratories, is that topical astressin-B will become an important tool in the arsenal against hair problems. With consistent application, many users may enjoy noticeable improvement.

    Here is an article on astressin-B that was published in February of 2016:

    Characterization of Multisubstituted Corticotropin Releasing Factor (CRF) Peptide Antagonists (Astressins)

    Judit Erchegyi†, Lixin Wang‡, Jozsef Gulyas†, Manoj Samant†, Marilyn H. Perrin†, Kathy Lewis†, Charleen Miller†, Joan Vaughan†, Cynthia Donaldson†, Wolfgang Fischer†, William Low†, Seiichi Yakabi‡, Hiroshi Karasawa‡, Yvette Taché‡, Catherine Rivier†, and Jean Rivier*†

    J. Med. Chem., 2016, 59 (3), pp 854–866
    DOI: 10.1021/acs.jmedchem.5b00926
    Publication Date (Web): January 20, 2016
    Copyright © 2016 American Chemical Society
    ______________________________________________________________

    “AstB and its analogues show similar potency as the nonselective antagonist Ast8 at inhibiting the intracellular cAMP accumulation stimulated by 10 nM hCRF in AtT-20 cells expressing CRF-R1 receptor” – Pretty much cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) is a secondary messenger in the human body that is involved in many physiological pathways, the only one that I can think of off the top of my head at the moment is cAMP/cGMP affect on vasodilation via induction of Nitric oxide synthase by l-arginine, which then produces nitric oxide which then stimulate adenylyl cyclase (g protein signaling), which causes the production of cAMP which then causes relaxation of smooth vascular muscles (viagra). Anyways. I know this was long, but just wanted to share it,.

    1. AND I am not implying that astressin-b effects blood vessels. Overall it is just blocking the negative effects of cortisol (the longterm stress hormone)

        1. Actually the pics on the DS labs Mexico website look promising. But you know, here in the US everything has to look perfect at first glance.

          In light of every completed clinical trial or study that had been posted on this forum by anyone, there is a major factor that is not being discussed (And I won’t/can’t fault anyone for this). STATISTICAL ANALYSES. What type of statistical testing was used in a study, how TRUELY random was the selection of participants, was there selection bias? What journal was the article published in (the more reputable the journal the better)? Was all participant data included in the results or only those that managed to participate for the entire study? Were the results statistically significant? Were the results clinically significant?

    1. The topical spectral F7 yes. And in the package insert that comes with the topical, as I stated above, it says that spectral F7 is marketed as a cosmetic agent. And any future treatments (oral, such as integra) would be marketed as drugs. Which is why I posted on here a few weeks ago that i tried purchasing integra from their website (which the link also happens to be posted above) but they said they could not sell it to me because that would be illegal in the United States. So I’m not sure what they’re planning with integra for the US.

      1. I can be bought online when you are in Europe now, while 2 weeks ago it could not be added to the online shopping cart. The website states it is not FDA approved, is it still a cosmetic then?

        1. Interesting because the DS labs US website once again states “not for sale” when earlier today it stated “add to cart”

  35. Thanks Admin for such an interesting and valuable blog. You r doing an awesome work. Do you have any update of Samumed ariund their phase IIb clinical trials??? Looks like they are dead by now 🙁

  36. Hi all, id like to know what is the hold up with setipiprant trial? Many of you have been talking it up for a while now but trials still have not begun nor have they started enrolling anyone.
    second question: when is this brotzu lotion supposed to be available?
    Thank you

    1. Setiprepant will actually be administered via the clinical trial at the hospital I work at (one of half a dozen hospitals the trial will be taking place at in the US). However, curiosity, even if driven by altruism does not justify for me to go snooping around. The details of the clinical trial are protected under HIPAA (can be very complicated). With that said….I will say no more. “Big brother is always watching”

      I will say that with as much hair loss that is going on, and because of the prestige of the hospital where I work, the clinical trial will move forward accordingly.

  37. Phil Collins thanks for responding. Will you be participating in the trial? I hope to however I fear i will be part of the finasteride group which is a big no no to me due to intolerable sides.

    1. No I will not be participating in the trial, since I do not meet the inclusion criteria. I’ll be sure to post any pertinent updates that may pass through the grapevine

  38. Six million is not a big deal, if funding is the only problem try to get in contact with ambani group in india, am sure they always welcome fine business approach.

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