Brief Items of Interest, October 2016

Hair loss news first:

Update: A day after I wrote this post, CNN covered JAK inhibitors in a new article (in a pleasant surprise, they also looked at the androgenetic alopecia — AGA — angle).  Usually, all these articles on JAK inhibitors only look at alopecia areata (AA).  Yet again, Dr. Christiano says she is optimistic that JAKs could work on AGA patients (but only in a topical form).  Dr. Brett King is not optimistic, but he is still testing it out (in a lotion form) on his AA patients (probably the ones who also have AGA).  In the above article, the one AA patient who they show with regrown hair after being on oral JAK inhibitors did not regrow hair that he lost to AGA, although it is impossible to tell whether he did not regrow 100 percent of his AGA hair loss or not.  In any event, we will only know for sure about this once they test topical JAK inhibitors out so people should not get so emotional about this subject each time there are new developments.  You should also not try to test your own topical version as even the experts are having a hard time developing the appropriate version.  According to Dr. Christiano:

“Though she thinks men might have the same success with an ointment, she said the trick is that it has to penetrate properly. Compared with the paper-thin skin of mice, human skin is “much thicker, and it’s oily, and it’s deep, and it’s got a fat layer — so there’s a lot to think about when making a good topical formula.”

It is well worth watching the video in the above article just to see the funky haired mice.

— In a first, myself as well as all of this blog’s commentators missed the important International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS)’s 24th Annual Congress that ran from September 28th through October 1st in Las Vegas.  I did not even see any threads on the conference in any of the hair loss forums out there, which is strange.  I usually cover the 2-3 most important hair loss related conferences in the world every year in separate posts, but this time I forgot to do so.  You can find the detailed ISHRS 24th Congress final program guide here.  As usual, there were way too many interesting presentations.  For our purposes, the most important ones were:

  • Dr. Angela Christiano: “JAK Inhibitors, Hair Regeneration and
    Genetic Testing”.
  • Dr. Pantelis Rompolas: “Potency and Contribution of Stem Cells to Hair Follicle Regeneration”.
  • Dr. Rodney Sinclair: “Advancing our Understanding of the Biology of Androgenetic Alopecia and Changing the way we use Minoxidil to Treat it”.
  • Dr. Angela Christiano and Dr. Ken Washenik led a discussion titled “Biotechnology in Hair Regeneration”.

On Twitter, Dr. Alan Bauman told me that while Dr. Christiano did not provide any data on JAK inhibitors for androgenetic alopecia (AGA), she did hint that JAK inhibitors seem to stimulate the anagen phase of the hair growth cycle.  Fingers crossed as usual when it comes to this subject.  I was surprised at the number of presentations on body hair transplants (BHT), with Dr. Arvind Poswal discussing long-term ten-year plus results of his BHT patients.  Also surprising were the number of presentations on platelet-rich plasma (PRP).

— In stark contrast to the above glaring omission, in the past week at least 10 (!) people either commented under a blog post or e-mailed me about cosmetics behemoth L’oréal (France) and Poietis (France) partnering to bioprint hair follicles via laser. This news item was extremely well covered across the global media and there are hundreds of articles on the internet about this interesting subject matter.  The end goal “holy grail” of this research will be to implant the new hair follicles into balding regions.  Below is the official company video outlining the technology and the goals behind this partnership:

— Unfortunately, it seems like Replicel has not fulfilled the contractual obligations of its partnership with Shiseido (although the former disputes this allegation).  In any event, it is unlikely that this will stop Shiseido from proceeding with its plans.

Cassiopeia (Italy) updates us on its topical anti-androgen product Breezula (formerly called CB-03-01).  Also see my past post on this subject.  It seems like even if phase 2 and phase 3 clinical trials succeed, this product will not come to market before 2021.

— Samumed’s Dr. Osman Kibar’s presentation (a small part of it is on hair loss) at a recent conference organized by the UK’s Royal Society of Medicine.  He received many compliments on Twitter for his presentation.

Cellmid has better than expected quarterly sales of its FGF5 inhibiting product Evolis in Australia.

Kerastem completes enrollment in Phase 2 clinical trials.

Spex has a brand new updated website, which is worth a visit.

— Former baseball great Jose Canseco just announced today that he will get a hair transplant with Dr. Parsa Mohebi next week.

— Sportscaster Joe Buck’s hair transplant addiction nearly cost him his voice and his career.

The benefits of going bald.  I would much rather have none of those benefits and hair instead:-)

Men’s vanity involves hair transplants.

And now on to medical items of interest:

— The National Geographic is a highly reputable magazine so I believe them when they say that ending blindness is no longer just a dream.

Rapamycin could make your dog (and maybe humans too) live longer.

Microsoft aims to cure cancer in ten years.  In the end it is just a programming error.

— A very interesting new endeavor: “Human Cell Atlas project aims to map the human body’s 35 trillion cells“.

Teeth regeneration advances.

Building a bionic spine.

3D printing continues to revolutionize the field of prosthetic limbs.

First “three person baby” born in Mexico (doctors went there from the USA so as to escape strict regulations).  Baby’s parents were Jordanian.  Medicine will hopefully soon become very multinational.

Stem cells regenerate damaged monkey heart.

— Yet more evidence that turmeric is very good for you, but only when added to food that is then cooked.

Endurance training causes positive genetic changes.

— Not sure if I believe half the stuff in the below video, but it is well presented with 100 percent thumbs up likes thus far: K. Comella: “Reversing Aging with Stem Cells”:

129 thoughts on “Brief Items of Interest, October 2016”

  1. Thanks admin, nice post. Evolis is a funny one…not seen any user reviews or forum posts about it, which one would assume to see if it had a positive effect. I had the feeling that it’sBS when I heard their CEO interviewed. Wonder how accurate their sales figs really are….

  2. I’m not sure I understood.

    Bioprint (l’Oréal/Poietis) from a follicle/hair existing/healthy?

    Don’t effective for egghead?

    1. @William It sounds like they are probably taking a biopsy from the patient, extracting the cells that are required to form hair follicles from that biopsy, multiplying those cells, then 3D printing brand new follicles with those multiplied cells in order to be later transplanted into the scalp of the patient.

      If they can achieve this, in theory it would likely be effective for completely bald people.

  3. Admin can you please write something about SMP. I know you mentioned you would soon but I’m in desperation mode due to real life events. I am interested in your opinion as SMP would be a viable option for a lot of us especially those with temple recession.

  4. Regarding L’Oreal

    “Hair follicles have not been created this way before and the firms expect it will take at least three years to adapt the process.”

    At which time, Tsuji’s method is due out in Japan via a much simpler process that they already know creates hair follicles. So, we’re at over 3 years before this would even enter clinical trials in an absolute best case scenario. By the time something like this would be approved in most countries, Organ Tech will have expanded outside of Japan for YEARS.

    It’s something to keep an eye on, but I feel confident that it won’t make much sense by the time it’s ready to go.

  5. Hey @ Chammpy, I lived in Australia happy to purchase Evolis for you and ship it to you in USA. Give me your email id, will take it from there

      1. Nope it shows Christiano thinks it quite possible, King thinks not. No surprise with either opinion. FYI — King is still trying to use it on the AGA region of the patient to see if it will work.

        1. Thanks admin, I hate that hopeless “might as well give up” mindset. We’ve never been closer than we are currently to a great treatment.

        1. @paul – I’m not saying hat it doesn’t work for Mpb but if you are basing that it does work for it off this picture I’m I terested in hearing how you drew that conclusion.

      2. They’ve said multiple times that oral JAKs won’t work for androgentetic alopecia, so until there’s pictures of a topical, this doesn’t prove much.

  6. @Susana, @spanky…. me too Brotzu can’t come soon enough

    got my haircut today after not cutting for 2 months and it’s not a pretty sight

  7. for thoses who saw this horseshoe pattern pic and deduced that jak doesn’t work for aga, for the thousand time cristiano already said that oral jak doesnt work for aga so we have to wait the topical results… of course it works but to what extent we don’t know yet ( its on the pipeline of aclaris …)

    1. The pictures look like the guy had aa and mpb using the jak just brought him back where he would be from mpb. Seems like it just took care of the immunal response.

        1. Haha some of the guys on HLT forums are crying that it’s all over. Even longtime members such as hello user does not know about topical vis oral!

  8. I want Jak inhibitors to work so bad, but I really dont understand how a topical will be more effective than oral. It obviously is able to make its way to the hair follicle if people with AA are regrowing it with oral jak. Maybe it would do a little more in topical form since in could be absorbed directly into the scalp, but you would think that it would atleast show some signs of improving mpb in the photos? His hair looks worse than mine even after taking the drug.

    1. Even I found that hard to believe in the past, but she gave a detailed scientific reason for it if I recall…when free I will try to find it again.

    2. Oral isn’t necessarily reaching the follicles in AA though, it’s sorting the immune issue which affects the follicles in AA. There are many many things that oral drugs can’t treat and only topical versions will work so its not too hard to believe.

      @Admin do you remember follicept? I remember them saying they has a special ‘delivery system’ for topical application of their drug – wonder if a delivery system could be used to help JAK penetrate the scalp. Sadly I think one of their team passed away and hence the research had stopped.

  9. Admin,

    Do u still think 2018 is the target gor follica? That link you posted that showd their 2018 prediction via their website is no longer a link.. Hope thats not a bad sign.

  10. Why is king still “testing” it when i thought this was aclaris property now? How long does it take this guy to test…is he working with aclaris?

  11. Top stuff Admin

    Once again we see the complexity of the hair follicle. I have come to the conclusion that the only thing comparable is the female mind. “I love you Terry, but I am not in love with you”. The next time I hear this inexplicable sentence I now know how to respond. “I understand baby, so many different type of cells, envoirement issues, genetics, etc. Enjoy your life with splendid thick haired Mark”. It won’t help my situation but at least it will give me the satisfaction that it will leave her just as confused as me.

    So Dr Christiano stipulates there is a chance for JAKS if some form of appropriate method of delivery is developed.? This makes sense, but though exciting, could be some years away? However, there is no need to fear my friends. After 30 years of hair transplants, lotion application, head scratching etc, my scalp barely exists, indeed, if you squint you can see my brain, which unfortunately is rather small. I therefore volunteer myself as a test subject.

    The loreal 3 d printing technique is fascinating. I actually have hopes that this is a realistic future cure, but it may be a bit early in 3 d technology to say it’s soon? I also enjoyed there video presentation. All the participants seemed to be follicaly challenged so to avoid the depressive urge to purchase a wig, they should be motivated to work day and night to find a solution.

    However, I must add that in the video I noticed a young lab technician with an excellent hairline. I am sure he’s a lovely boy and loves his mother, but with such luxurious hair I doubt his motivation? So without wishing to sound harsh, he should be sacked immediately.

    Thanks once again Admin.

  12. This hairloss cure Holy Grail is like a mirage. The closer we get the more it seems to just move away.

    I’m 30 and slowly starting to accept that my life is over. Even if the cure comes within the next 10 years, it doesn’t matter as I will be 40, and will have had 17 years of my prime life utterly devastated.

    What is L’Oreal doing that is different from Tsuji? Why can it be so hard to grow some damn hair, especially when I have it growing all over my body in places I do not want it to grow in?

    1. @Bald30:

      Tsuji: Surgeon takes a biopsy from the back of a patient’s head. Scientists takes the mesenchymal and epithelial cells from that biopsy, and multiplies them. Combines both types of cells in order to create “hair follicle germs” in the lab. These germs are then reinjected into the scalp, where they grow into fully functional DHT resistant hair follicles.

      L’Oreal: Surgeon takes biopsy from the back of a patient’s head. From that biopsy a scientist then cultivates the cells required to form a hair follicle. Those cells are then multiplied. Those cells are then put into a 3D printing machine. The machine prints out thousands of hair follicles. Those hair follicles are then transplanted into the patients scalp.

      In my opinion, Tsuji would be the ideal treatment of the two. It is good that L’Oreal is doing this though, as more competition in the market means more affordable prices and more options.

      1. “L’Oreal: Surgeon takes biopsy from the back of a patient’s head. From that biopsy a scientist then cultivates the cells required to form a hair follicle.”

        Yes, but I have not hair from the back of my head… I do not understand how it could work for someone like me who has no hair, including behind the head. Thank you RED for your previous response to my message, but how do you explain that it may be effective for someone who has nothing.

        1. Red, thank you for the reply.

          Not so sound dumb, but can you explain exactly what a biopsy is? I’ve heard the term innumerable times, but never fully understood it. Does it mean they’ll take some skin, hair or both? How much do they need? Will it be apparent they’ve taken something? Then again, I suppose when they’re filling an entire head, a small patch is easily replaced.

          William, I don’t understand. How can you have zero hair? Even if you’re NW6 like me, there’s still plenty of hair around the sides to have them take a sample from. Sorry for my ignorance.

          1. My baldness is total (across the scalp). I’m not on the scale of Norwoods. I do not have small crowns behind the head as the Norwoods 6 or 7. I have a total alopecia medicinal diffuse (Prozac / Risperidone / Concerta). Those with DUPA are in the same boat as me.

                1. @William

                  Even slick bald people still have hair follicles. Although your hair has miniaturized to the point where they no longer produce cosmetically significant hair, the cells that are required for cloning/printing are still present beneath the skin.

                  For this reason you shouldn’t have a problem getting back your hair with cloning/printing methods.

          2. @Bald30, A biopsy is the extraction of a very small segment of skin. This segment of skin will include various layers of skin, along with follicle structures.

            The biopsies that are proposed by these companies will be very small and the scar will be almost completely unnoticeable to the human eye. Someone would have to take a magnifying glass to your scalp in order to hope to see the scar left by such a biopsy.

    2. When you have 40 you will disire the cure in the same way. You life is not over AMD life dont finish in the 40s.
      Look around you and start count how many mans like you in the 30 and 20 are in the same f***** situation….
      Get you s***** and move on.

  13. yeah i don’t think that i am on board with JAK inhibitors anymore for mpb. It is fairly well known that oral minoxidil grows hair better than topical minox. different mechanism of action, but the stimulation of hair follicles from oral does work out so Jak inhibitors should effect mpb to a degree if in fact they did work. to say that the drug does not reach the follicle at all is highly questionable. I guess it also depends on where the drug itself actually works and where the body dispenses it.

    time will tell as always.

  14. Admin in a nutshell, what are u most confident in? Histogen replicel (Shieshedo) follica Tsuji? In sptie of the taking down the writting of 2018 prospectus, Do you think Follica is still aiming at 2018? Aside from those what really is in your hopes?

    1. Matt, your email address has a “Kevin” in there and I assume your real name is neither of those? We already have a Matt (who knows much more than me about hair) so please change your name right away to something uncommon. Would be disastrous if someone were to think that you are the other Matt.

      I noticed that you have posted 32 comments since June of last year and almost all are questions that can easily be answered if you read the blog posts or the forums and it seems like you do both so what gives?

      Around 60 percent of your past comments were addressed directly at me, usually asking a question, or sometimes telling me that a post is useless because it is not a cure, or sometimes advising me on something.

      4 of your 32 comments have curse words or distracting all caps in them.

      Now I have some questions for you for the first time ever, and I think you will be able to answer them if you reread some of my posts this year (I am too lazy and really need the answers by tomorrow SO PLEASE F****** HELP ME!!!).

      “In a nutshell, what do you think I am most confident in? Do I think that Follica is still aiming at 2018? Aside from that, what are my real hopes?”

      Considering how much I have helped you in the past, I expect your help asap so please reread all my posts from this year. No smart ass responses please or I will have to ban you. I will be waiting.

      1. Admin, dont need to be rude with the guys, if you dont like people to ask you questions just spent your time in other things, i dont care about the reasons you can give, they come to your website to take a look about the news in the hair’s world and a some of the users ask you questions and you ignore them, they give u views on your post and cause that you can add publicity and get and extra money or products for free, so i repeat, i dont care about your reasons, but you just need to be a bit more humble, we aprecciate your work, but dont like to see this kind of answer or the way you ignore some coments and only respond what interest you.

        it’s just and advice.

        1. noname, I have probably been rude to 5 people in 3 plus years of writing this blog. Not a bad average at all. Perhaps I was a bit unfair in this case, but I think you would understand more if you read his past 30-40 comments under 3 different names. Often annoying.

          Perhaps the person I have been most rude to is “mjones” but he is not banned and still posts on and off.

          Finally, I prefer to lose visitors then to deal with repetitive annoyances anyday.

  15. Where the hell is Nasa_rs with some ill informed optimism when we need him?! I thought he appeared instantly as soon as someone expressed doubts about JAK inhibition?!

  16. Hey Admin,

    You mentioned in the article that the trouble with applying JAK as oinment was that it wouldn’t penetrate the human skin. If you remember, Follicept (, had a product that solved this. They tried to deliver IGF-1 through it and that failed. But their primary innovation was in finding a medium to transfer large molecules across human skin. Sadly one of their main staff, Devon Grimme, passed away last year. So I don’t know if they are still in operation.

  17. Ahah Farhan I like your apple store analogy!

    I can also bet that this one company will see explosive growth just like apple did in the past 10 years (and counting).

    That’s why I’m waiting on the sidelines with some cash ready to be deployed on this stock.
    What better than gaining a full head of hair to perpetuity while getting hella rich at the same time?

    1. Nice find @hopeful

      “I am genuinely thrilled to join a team as accomplished as Histogen’s at this important juncture in the commercialization process. I look forward to contributing to the success of its commercial products as well as a plethora of future new product opportunities”. -Dr. Latterich

      That’s good news. Sounds like Histogen is gearing up for the commercial stage of their produxt.

  18. JAK inhibitors are a very interesting angle. There are mast cells, A LOT OF THEM, in the skin. They secrete all kinds of inflammatory mediators, including histamine and CRH, both of which in some studies are linked to hair loss. The CRH seems to be functioning in an autocrine or paracrine way, although if there is overload, like in histamine intolerance, it could be enough to be systemic/endocrine – pumping up adrenal function and DHEA (which can convert to DHT). Interestingly, testosterone and DHT ameliorate histamine – they degrade it. So maybe the skin converts it to rid itself of the histamine reactions. Estrogen does not degrade histamine, in fact the opposite is true. Progesterone binds to the AR receptor and also acts to stabilize mast cells. mast cells do not have to fully degranulate to release their inflammatory cytokines, they can do it selectively, they “leak”. May be worth trying to find out if you have a naturally higher level of histamine. If you have low DAO enzyme, this enzyme degrades L-histadine in foods, your body will convert the excess histadine coming in from the gut to histamine – this is #1 cause of histamine intolerance – check out symptoms to see if you match (google it). DAO gene is AOC1 on 23andmeYou need not have every symptom to have a problem. If you have slowed HNMT or MAO enzymes you can also have higher histamine levels. DAO is also produced during pregnancy, by the placenta, in HUGE AMOUNTS, 500-1000x the non-pregnant state. women with allergies often have complete remission. This is why women are so tired during first trimester, histamine gets lowered by the DAO increase, which ramps up during first month then stays high. Body does get used to the new lower level. It is like if you titer up on a anti-histamine like Elavil/amitryptiline, you are a zombie until body adjusts. But antihistamines block the H receptor they do not get rid of the histamine. DAO actually prevents the raw material from entering the system. You can buy the enzyme and take it if you have histamine intolerance. You can get low DAO function even if not genetic, by medicines or gut disfunction. And you do know women nearly completely stop shedding hair during pregnancy too (and then catch up with a big shed post partum). so is it the DAO or the Progesterone? Or both????
    DAO enzyme can be had on Amazon. For it to be effective, you need to take 2 capsules before every meal, 3 if big meal with a lot of protein, and 1 cap before snacks. If you are not religious about it, don’t bother, the body is very efficient at making histamine if you let histadine in.
    JAK inhibitors are being trialed for arthritis, look up low DAO and arthritis and asthma and MS and a number of other inflammatory issues….you’ll find hits.

    1. Thank you for sharing Maddy! I believe I have A histomind intolerance and have purchased an enzyme supplement. It’s early days, but i already feel a small improvement! Your post really helped me link my symptoms together!

  19. Admin, thanks for the insult. What is this high school? Yeah okay. Block me with your bald ass. Have read your blog for years but if thats how one chooses to respond then i will read no more.

    1. Most of your comments in the past (as well as the latest one) are clearly at an elementary school level “Matt”, so I thought I was doing you a favor by only moving down to high school level.

      I also just noticed that you used several other names in the past including Replicel and replicel55 as well as a few different fake e-mail addresses.

  20. More than 4 moths ago i show proofs that if you take jak for AA and you have MPB to, you will grow horseshoe pattern…
    Now 2 por 3 users from here what are waiting to comment about that?
    I have another photos send me from a man that are taking jak in lotion and a will get photos from him. I know him from alopecia world.
    Maybe if i get some Apologize i wil post the result.

      1. The immune response attacking all the hair would be reversed with jak but most like dht has been taking its toll also so you’d be seeing the mpbs progression after aa was treated.

          1. @Bald30 – if a person has AA, their immune response affects all their hair follicles. Some people with AA also have MPB. Oral JAK reverses the AA but not the MPB. So only the MPB is left showing as a horseshoe pattern.

            1. What’s AA and how do you determine if you have it? If I have the horseshoe pattern, does it mean I definitely have MPB and not AA?

                    1. Glad you ask Bald30 when I set up calenders for the following 5 years, position a fan on them to blow through the pages/months close my eyes and throw a dart I landed on February 6 2021. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for that very day…. Cmon dude like we know we’re all here waiting for that to be answered look up Alopecia Areata on google images and compare them with yourself if you think you might have it. If you have a horshoe I do not think you have AA. MPB would definately be your ailment.

      1. Yes the mice used a topical, but the mice didnt have MPB like we have it. They were engineered to be bald mice but not thru the same ways we are losing hair.
        Because we still dont know all the factors that cause mpb in men, so how the f could she replicate it in a mouse??? Its insane she thinks that the right vehicle will be the solution, only because it worked on mice.
        Its a totally different ball game and she should be smart enough to realize that.

        Ever since she made a comment about how “women” are affected by hairloss this woman has pissed me off. Shes seems oblivious to our pain

        1. @Champpy
          You could be right but maybe it works. The problem is they have to test it at different concentration levels, they don’t know witch concentration will potentially work in a topical formula, that’s why it takes so much time. Most probably at the end of 2017 we will know if it works or not.

        2. The mice weren’t engineered to be bald. They were simply shaved. Applying the topical kickstarted the follicles into a rapid growth phase. Hence there is still good reason to believe it would work for MPB or at least thinning hair. If a follicle still remains and is simply dormant after reaching slick bald it should theoretically still work..

          1. No sir. They do more than just shave the mouse. Shaving it doesnt prove a thing. Hair will grow back regardless, just maybe faster with a stimulant. Don’t ask me how they modified the mice because I really have no idea, but I’ve read that these mice were engineered to be bald

            1. Shaved.. would explain the already hairy head and legs. The point of testing on shaved mice is not to see IF it grows back. Of course it will. The point is to see what effect the topical has on the follicles. It created a robust and rapid growth cycle on the treated area. Remember those pics are after only something like 10 days. The treated side is back to normal and the untreated is still short.. Ten days worth of normal growth.

  21. I am wondering, if it is very tricky for JAK inhibitors to penetrate properly, wouldn’t injection be a way around this? (at least for the prupose of trials). This is how Histogen has no penetration issues…

  22. Exactly Hopeful. I was thinking the same …
    If the human skin is more thicker than mice so why Christiano dont try symply to make an injectuin Under the skin ?
    If Jak would work for us, just hope that we could have something better than an oily ointment or pommade to apply in our hairs !!
    Of course a pill like the clinical trial with setipiprant 100 mg would be the best form but I am not sure it could work…

      1. Good point, but there might be MPB volunteers who accept frequent injections (just to know it revives the follicles), and then the penetration issue would be secondary, I guess.

  23. admin
    Fidia was supposed to release some news after the summer holidays about the release of Brotzu lotion. Have you heard any news on this?

  24. Interesting article. As we have known, this isn’t going to work orally in AGA getting completely miniaturized follicles back. In AGA the hair follicle eventually miniaturizes completely, and ends way up in the fat of the skin…. completely away from any vasculature. So this makes sense why it can rescue orally follicles that are “undergoing” AGA miniaturization but still have a method for the drug to reach them…. but cannot reach the ones that have no method for the medicine to reach it. I think the fact that this regrew topically in skin engineered to be like human male skin is really encouraging.

    1. Perhaps the oral version of JAK/stat inhibition is enough to reach the dermal papilla of hair follicles undergoing miniaturization. But if AGA is really a stem cell + dermal papilla problem, you would certainly need a topical that can reach both to have any chance of reversal

  25. Hi anyone on here a member of btt? There is a guy on there named “k9gatton” who seems to be having some luck with progesterone. He does however fail to mention the exact product he is using. One of my pet peeves is when people fail to include the actual name of the product. Can anyone ask him the name of the product amd where to purchase? This could be helpful for guys that cant tolerate the big guns. Thanks guys and girls I really appreciate your time.

  26. Stea…mjones is just going to sit back and wait for either cots, histogen or SM and pray Propecia and Rogaine can hold his hair for another couple years for these potential treatments to hit the market. To be completely honest I am starting to give up and accept. Balding is exhausting and I’m tired of it. Fingers crossed for a miracle in 2017 – 2018

    1. you forgot Brotzu,follicum and then ultimate treatment of either Tsuji or either 3D bio printed hair..within like 5 ish years. Also Steve guy, how does being bald make you “sub-human”? Jason Stathom dates a Victoria secret model and Dwayne Johnson is bad ass and both are better looking then most guys with hair. Your face is more important than hair, and if you face was beat to begin with…then I don’t know, learn French or something to get girls.

  27. I have really bad news for you Steve….MPB will be “cured” very soon. The title of the blog is very true. I’m so sad for people who win “Money” with snake oils and others. It’s time to change this industry of shame and liars.

  28. I see people referring to Tsuji all the time, but what’s the thumbnail version of what he/it will bring us? When I google its unclear other than that he partnered with a large Japanese firm…

    1. The short version is:

      Extract a small sample of hair via biopsy (like a small coin size sample from back of head).

      Then split those hairs, extract cells, then put them through a cell culturing process that will be automated.

      Apparently can yield up to 100,000 hairs as well as controlling the thickness of each individual hair.

      It’ll essentially be a permanent full, thick, dense mane of hair with razor straight hairline for all MPB sufferers who want it, with the cost estimates to be sub-$10k, i.e. a bargain.

        1. @hangininthewire go to Hairlosstalk and check out Tsuji interview it gives what we know so far however the price they mention they do not know at this time how much it will cost.

          1. Sorry, could have sworn I read $10k or under somewhere. I’m pretty sure in another post on this forum in the comments. Could be hearsay, though.

  29. Well I hope it’s 10 all they said in the interview is that as a new treatment it’s gonna be a little spendy in 2020 at least that’s what I interpreted.

    1. Correct me if I’m wrong but I believe Kyocera is the one that comes in for the implantation making the technology to do it automatically like ARTAS or are they just making a machine to culture the meso cells? It’d be hell slaving away 70000 follicles by hand I assume depending what level of hair loss the patient is at.

  30. this is obviously the holy grail but of course even when dealing with autologous cells its still a concern with all the steps they have to go through that something doesn’t get thrown out of whack and the potential for cancer risk isn’t thrown in there. I would rather wait till 2022 and all that be resolved rather than take a chance and trust me I hate waiting on getting more hair like the rest of us but i don’t want to die for it.

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